Life Has No Price Tag!

Life Has No Price Tag!

I once read the story of a man who had the habit of misplacing his watches. Times without number, he could not tell his time― he had misplaced his watch. To ‘heal’ this habit, a friend advised him, “Buy a very expensive watch!”
He wondered how that could help. All the same, he paid heed to his friend’s counsel and bought the most expensive watch he could lay his hands on. A year later, his friend asked him how many more watches he had bought after buying the expensive one. He replied, “None!”
“Why?”
“I protect it with all of my life because it is too expensive to be misplaced!”
Some things are too expensive to be misplaced or lost. Some commodities are too expensive to be traded. If we know the value of what we have, we treat them with utmost honor.
If you want to know how invaluable a thing means to someone, just observe how they regard it. No one buys a million dollar Bugatti and treats it like trash. The value we put on the people and things around us tells how far we will go to keep them.
When we have no value for something, we abuse it. If you want to understand value, look at how well users treat an iphone they bought with their hard-earned money. They would go every length to keep it safe. They would rather prefer a broken leg to a broken screen! Haha.
The irony of life is that we treat with little or no regard the most priceless things because we have no idea of their worth. We think air (oxygen) is cheap until we need to buy it from the hospital. Our lives seem to have no value until we beg to have more of it on our death beds.
Life is irreplaceable. Life, when literally broken, is irreparable. Life is so expensive that it can’t be bought. Regardless of all of one’s wealth, they can’t buy an extra life. Only if we understood that life was too expensive to have a price tag, we wouldn’t have treated it as cheaply as rag!
One thing that always beats my imagination is the lynching of people for whatever wrong they presumably committed. I am oftentimes awestruck for the reasons people get mobbed. My recent shock was when a gentleman was lynched over a measly GHC 1.50. Can you imagine!?
When we understand the value of life, we understand how to treat it, regardless of what wrong that life may have supposedly done. We have no idea that one of the commodities that can’t ever be bought is life. If we did, we won’t take it away at the least suspicion.
Our hypocrisy has blinded our minds to understand life’s value. Our false sense of morality has risen to the high heavens that we think others need to die in public for the same (or even greater) sins we commit in our closets!
We may blame lynching on mistrust in the judiciary system but, trust me, no judiciary system can ever be perfect as long as it is manned by men. No matter how effective our judiciary system may be, even criminals caught in the act would always have the chance to prove themselves innocent.
We can’t pronounce instant justice on others when we have all agreed that the judiciary should dispense justice. When others have not had a fair trial, we have no right to pronounce them guilty. Who are you to stone another to death according to your own instant, skewed yardstick of judgment?
Ironically, those who do the stoning have a whole world of sins to hide. Those who are at the forefront of lynching others have volumes of sins which, to them, are lesser than those of their victims. Who weighs [our] sins? We can’t weigh our own sins on our partial, unbalanced scales and present them as lighter than those of others!
Before you think of hurling a stone at an alleged thief, first think about the ills you last did with those same hands of yours. They may just be worse than the thief’s. Reminds me of the adulteress who was brought before Jesus by her accusers.
When we use the same scale to weigh others’ sins and ours, we get to know that we are not in any better position to stone them. When we ponder over the wrongs we do under the shade of darkness and compare them to what others have been caught in the act doing, we would come to the sad realization that we deserve to be lynched, too, if not instead.
Don’t lynch. Have value for life. Don’t take something you can’t give. Don’t brutalize others because you somewhat lost trust in the Police. Tomorrow, you may just be a victim, too, because another may have lost it for the judiciary. We all look like thieves until proven innocent. Let the law have its way. Don’t be the law!
Each of us must be innocent until proven guilty. A fair trial is what separates the innocent from the guilty. A fair trial takes place only in court… not on the streets in the presence of an irate mob whose only intention is to undervalue one of the most expensive commodities on Earth― life.
Justice is like success. There’s no instant version of it. When you mete out justice at the wrong time, you mete it out to the wrong people. When we value life, we value justice. If we can’t buy life, we can’t sell instant justice either. Instant justice only means gross disrespect for life.
The value of life is infinite. If anyone has it today, value it, even if they did wrong. Don’t waste it like some ‘second-hand’ watch because life has no price tag. You can’t get to buy it anywhere!
The writer is a playwright and Chief Scribe of Scribe Communications (www.scribecommltd.com), a writing company based in Accra. His upcoming play is TRIBELESS.

Young Ghanaians launch wedding planning mobile app.

Young Ghanaians launch wedding planning mobile app.

Wedding planning just got easier! The stress couples have to endure to have a successful wedding just got eased up. The Ayefro app is here.

IMG_1295

“Ayefro” in Twi means wedding.

Ayefro Digital Solutions Ltd, developers of the Ayefro Inc mobile app launched their app during a fun, interactive and educative session at the Holiday Inn hotel, in Accra, Ghana.

The Ayefro Inc. Mobile app connects event vendors and their clients on one platform. It provides Fun, Fast and Reliable event planning on the go!

The objective of the launch was to create brand awareness for our mobile app, drive downloads, and to connect event service providers and clients together.

The event was attended by event vendors ranging from photographers, Decor companies, Music and live band companies, Catering companies, Wedding Planners, and Advertising companies.

They demonstrated how the app solves 4 (four) major challenges experienced in real life when it comes to the events industry.

1. Finding the right service providers for your events
2. Finding clients and increasing jobs for vendors
3. High price charged for services during weddings and other events
4. Clients not paying for services after events are over.

A team member said, “We promised to reach 1 million users in the next 3 years. Our app is currently on android only, but an iOS version is in development. The app is currently in use in 5 countries. Ghana, Nigeria, Benin and Ivory Coast.”

What a time to get married!
Source: Scribe News

DAKPABLI READATHON OUTDOORS  ELIZABETH-IRENE BAITIE

DAKPABLI READATHON OUTDOORS ELIZABETH-IRENE BAITIE

Award-winning Ghanaian author Elizabeth-Irene Baitie will this weekend mount the stage to delight book lovers as the latest guest reader of the DAkpabli Public Reading Campaign. The University of Ghana, Legon Campus edition event is dubbed ‘’Tickling Legon with Nsempiisms’’ and takes place on Saturday March 25th at the Alumni Centre, Ecobank Legon.

Baitie is expected to feature along the regular stars Nana Awere Damoah and Kofi Akpabli in their first readathon of this second quarter. A medical laboratory director as well as mother of three children, she lives in Accra with her husband Rami. Awards she has won for her novels includes the Macmillan Writer’s Prize for Africa and the Burt Award for African Literature.

The guest reader is expected to thrill the university audience with readings from her works such as A Saint in Brown Sandals, The Twelfth Heart, The Dorm Challenge and Rattling in the Closet.

Ahead of the event, students and lecturers alike are excited to catch the National Readathon train in their own backyard.

“We are going to be there in our numbers,” said Dr. Mawuli Adjei, a Senior Lecturer at the English department. “A year ago, I was among the participants at their public reading at East Legon and it was an evening of laughter and learning.”

According to Marie-Franz Nyameke Fordjoe, a Level 400 Political Science student and hostess of the literary program Read A Book on Radio Univers, the event on Legon campus has been long overdue. “I cannot believe that the DAkpabli Readathon passed us by and visited KNUST last September. I also cannot wait to see their new guest reader, Elizabeth-Irene”.

The DAkpabli Readathon promotes book reading for pleasure as well as local authorship. Besides holding public reading events within Accra, the team has also gone to Kumasi, Ho and Tema. The Readathon campaign by the two authors has received local and international press coverage with ChinAfrican magazine doing a special feature on them in their January edition for 2017.

Between them, the two Ghanaian authors have published 12 books. Nana Damoah has recently been voted ‘Author of the Month’ by KWEE, a Liberian Literary magazine, while Kofi Akpabli’s latest work ‘Made In Nima’ has won a place in an African anthology featuring writers from 14 countries which was published by the Commonwealth in London.

In their readings so far, the two have received sponsorship from THREADEX, Aky3de3, MTN, Unicorn Rentals, WearGhana, Norte Sobolo, Lincar, Sasa Clothing, Fali’s Fruit Bay and AJ’s Housekeeping Services.

Elizabeth-Irene Baitie becomes the third guest reader in the row, having taken over from Dr. Ruby Goka, a celebrated author and dentist. The first DAkpabli guest was Alba Sumprim, author and film producer.

During her guest reader tenure, Elizabeth-Irene Baitie is expected to star at all DAkpabli Readathon events. “Getting that phone call to come on board was such a thrill. It’s a fine opportunity, joining a laudable initiative to bring reading and writing closer to our people. I just can’t wait to start working with the team.’’

“Tickling Legon with Nsempisms” kicks off at 5:30 pm prompt.

ReggieNBollie ‘This is the life’ Music Video

ReggieNBollie ‘This is the life’ Music Video

 

 

ReggieNBollie have dropped a major hint on the much-anticipated music video for their recent single release ‘this is the life’. The duo shared the 30 seconds video teaser on Facebook with the caption “Our Official Video for ‘This Is The Life’ will be out SOOONNN!! We can’t wait for you to watch the full video. Stay Tuned!”
IMG_1172
Glee filled with awesome pictures and graphics, the UK pop duo believe the new music video which was directed by Sesan and set to be released in few days, has the quality to bring much excitement to fans all over the world and win awards.
Check the link below to watch the teaser for ‘this is the life’ video…

Enjoy !!!

 

David Adjaye, Renowned Ghanaian Architect Who Designed the new African-American Museum in Washington DC to be Celebrated in Ghana, along with other Notable Ghanaian Pioneers

David Adjaye, Renowned Ghanaian Architect Who Designed the new African-American Museum in Washington DC to be Celebrated in Ghana, along with other Notable Ghanaian Pioneers

“The world will only come to appreciate Africa when we learn to celebrate our own.” These are the words of Managing Director of Bábu Global, Sandra Appiah, the company behind the prestigious Ghana Legacy Honors launching on March 25th at the MovenpickAmbassador Hotel.

In 2013, Sandra Appiah and partner Isaac Boateng were the first Ghanaians to be featured in Forbes’ “Thirty Under 30: Africa’s Best Young Entrepreneurs”, an annual list which profiles exceptional young Entrepreneurs of African descent around the world. Since launching in 2011, their media company Face2face Africa has served as a leading voice for the pan-African generation, helping to change the narrative on Africa in the West.

“The Ghana Legacy Honors is an initiative that is very close and near to our hearts. Ghana, for us, represents the legacy of Africa, and there have been so many people since our independence who have blazed the path for Ghana to be the distinguished nation that it is today. We launched this initiative to help tell the stories of these individuals and inspire the next generation to also become vanguards of Ghana’s legacy.”

This year, the Ghana Legacy Awards will honor six distinguished pioneers and trailblazers of African descent, including business magnate Sam Jonah, renowned tech innovator Herman Chinery-Hesse, African human rights and anti-corruption leader Anna Bossman, and distinguished corporate executive Lucy Quist. Two of the honorees, David Adjaye and Ozwald Boateng are Ghanaian descendants who reside in the UK.

Ozwald Boateng is a renowned UK-based Fashion designer who has had a transformational impact on mens fashion-wear for almost 3 decades. He was the first Black designer to open a shop on the popular Savile Row in London, and previously served as Creative Director of Menswear for French fashion house Givenchy.

David Adjaye is currently one of the most sought-after architects in the world, having designed some of the world’s biggest monuments, including the new Smithsonian Museum of African American History, which officially opened last year with a ceremony officiated by president Barack Obama.

“It is very important to celebrate these individuals who have broken glass ceilings and blazed a path for Ghanaians and Africans around the world, and use their stories to inspire the next generation. We have been fortunate to meet so many of these people,and through this platform, we hope to expose to the world the talent, creativity, and passion that lives in Ghana.”

The Ghana Legacy Honors will provide the opportunity for these pioneers to invest in the younger generation through various meet and greets, seminars and workshops where they can share their stories and inspire them.

The awards gala is taking place this Saturday at the Movenpick Ambassador Hotel. Top local and international business leaders as well as Ghanaian and African dignitaries are expected to attend. For corporate tables or tickets, please visit Ghanalegacy.com, email glh@babuglobal.com. or call 0506556661

An Open Letter To The Boy Who Wasn’t Ready For Me

An Open Letter To The Boy Who Wasn’t Ready For Me

It’s been almost three years since we first met. It feels like longer; how can so much have changed in such a short span of time? I still remember the very first time I saw you, but I guess I didn’t really see you then. You were just that friend of that guy that I know. I barely even looked at you when we were introduced—I was too caught up in my own life at the time. I never would have guessed in that moment that you’d be the one who would change everything.

IMG_1168

It doesn’t make sense, but I feel like I owe you. That’s the thing about love, isn’t it? You left me scattered on the sidewalk but I’m the one apologizing for the mess. But we weren’t always messy. We were epic. Sure, we fought a lot but you also made me laugh harder than I ever have before. I think we were meant to be, but we were young and stupid and we did it wrong.
Looking back now, it’s hard to remember our mistakes. It’s hard to remember anything, really, except the feeling. I didn’t know what love was before I met you, but now you’re the very definition of it. I think that’s what makes first loves so monumental: For the rest of my life, my idea of love and relationships will always be rooted in you…in us. Not because I still love you, but because I did once and it changed everything.
I was angry with you for a long time after you left. I went to bed every night praying that the sun would rise and I’d finally forget your name. I tried to convince myself that I didn’t love you anymore. I knew it was possible; if I could be convinced that you never loved me, why couldn’t I do the opposite? But that’s not how it works, is it? You’re still the only one that knows the truth. You got to walk away knowing that I loved you. I was left drowning, not knowing anything.
I could have filled this letter with clichés like “it’s your loss” and blah blah blah, but I don’t really believe that. Yes, I would have done anything for you and you walked away from that, but maybe there’s more to it. Maybe we were lucky to have what we did at such a young age, even if we did burn too quickly. Maybe timing is everything, and maybe ours was all wrong. Maybe we really weren’t meant to be. Either way, I don’t blame you for leaving all those years ago.
I’m too much of a romantic to believe you never think of me. I hope you look at the empty side of your bed and wonder what I’m doing or what I’m thinking or if I look at the empty side of my bed and think of you sometimes too. Maybe I am too romantic. Maybe you never think of me at all. Maybe I’m just that girl you knew three years ago. Sometimes you scroll past my face on your newsfeed. Maybe you just keep scrolling. The truth is that I don’t know. I don’t know what made you leave. I don’t know what made you stay gone.
I have come to accept that we will always be a question left unanswered.

By Charlotte Emeljanow in LOVE
Source : hercampus.com